bloomlogo This Pulitzer Prize-winning strip was launched on December 8, 1980 in only twelve papers, a number that would eventually rise to a peak of 1,200 with a combined readership of over 75 million people. Licensing, especially of Opus, would transition Bloom County from cult favorite to a phenomenon, one poised to enter the American zeitgeist. On August 6, 1989, Breathed ended Bloom County. The Complete Bloom County Library reprints the entire original series in five volumes.

    Bloom County The Complete Library

    Vol. 1: 1980-1982
    by Berkeley Breathed

    Edited by Scott Dunbier, Designed by Dean Mullaney. Introductions by Berkeley Breathted, Dean Mullaney, and Bruce Canwell.

    WINNER OF THE 2010 EISNER AWARD: "Best Archival Project"!!!

    NEW YORK TIMES BEST-SELLER!!!

    This first volume includes every strip from the beginning through 1982. This is the first time that many of these comic strips have been collected. The book also contains several never-before-published dailies, as well as a series of "Context Pages" sprinkled throughout the volumes, providing perspective for the reader and presenting a variety of real-life events and personalities that were contemporary at the time of original publication. Breathed has also added his own exclusive behind-the-scenes commentary points throughout the book.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover, 288 pp., $39.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-140-3.

    Bloom County The Complete Library

    Vol. 2: 1982-1984
    by Berkeley Breathed

    Edited by Scott Dunbier, Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Ted Koppel.

    Every Bloom County daily and color Sunday from 1982 through 1984, with exclusive "making of" notes by Berkeley Breathed, and previously unpublished artwork.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover, 320 pp., $39.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-583-8.

    Bloom County The Complete Library

    Vol. 3: 1984-1986
    by Berkeley Breathed

    Edited by Scott Dunbier, Designed by Dean Mullaney.

    Every Bloom County daily and color Sunday from July 2, 1984 through February 23, 1986, with exclusive "making of" notes by Berkeley Breathed.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover, 270 pp., $39.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-755-9.

    Bloom County The Complete Library

    Vol. 5: 1987-1989
    by Berkeley Breathed

    Edited by Scott Dunbier, Designed by Dean Mullaney.

    The conclusion of the complete Bloom County daily and color Sunday strips—this time from November 30, 1987 through the farewell Sunday, August 6, 1989—with a new introduction by Berkeley Breathed.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover, 288 pp., $39.99. ISBN: 978-1-61377-128-0.

    Bloom County The Complete Library

    Vol. 4: 1986-1987
    by Berkeley Breathed

    Edited by Scott Dunbier, Designed by Dean Mullaney.
    Introduction by Chris Mazin.

    Every Bloom County daily and color Sunday from March 31, 1984 through November 29, 1987, with exclusive "making of" notes by Berkeley Breathed, and a panorama of Bloom County merchandise.

    Oversized 11" x 8.5" hardcover, 288 pp., $39.99. ISBN: 978-1-60010-899-0.

Berkley Breathed

Berkeley Breathed was born in Southern California and raised in Texas. As a University of Texas student he created what would be the precursor to Bloom County for The Daily Texan, The Academia Waltz. Two small collections of Waltz were self-published by Breathed and generated enough profits to comfortably pay his tuition.

His initial success brought him to the attention of The Washington Post, and an offer to create a nationally syndicated newspaper strip.

Breathed is also an acclaimed children's book author and his first novel, Flawed Dogs: The Shocking Raid on Westminster, was recently released.

He lives in California with his wife and two children, and is an avid outdoorsman and supporter of animal-rights causes and wildlife conservation issues.

 

"Bloom County: The Complete Library [is] the best collected edition volume of a comic strip that I've seen to date."
-Augie De Blieck Jr.,
Comic Book Resources

"Years before South Park, Bloom County existed in an oddball inter-dimension between the cartoon world and the real world. But what seems spectacularly fresh now is Breathed's complete absence of snark. His weird whimsy and lack of cruelty are positively quaint today.
-New York Magazine

"Bloom County burst onto the comics scene in 1980 unlike any other newspaper strip. Irreverent and political, the daily series drew a devoted following and influenced the tone of many subsequent strips. In its topical but absurdist humor, Bloom County now seems like a bridge between Doonesbury and The Simpsons - with The Daily Show as a clear successor."

-Thom Geier
Entertainment Weekly